High Profile Trials

Lessons learned about technology in courtrooms when the stakes are high and the paparazzi persistent.

, Law Technology News

   | 2 Comments

Law Technology News wishes you and your families a safe, happy holiday season. As we look forward to the new year, we are reprising some of the best stories of 2013. Ever since we launched Technology on Trial in 2002, it's been a favorite feature. In August, we looked back at some of the most interesting reports-everything from the contentious McCourt "Dodgers" divorce to the Casey Anthony murder trial-that explored the crucial role played by technology. It's fascinating reading!

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What's being said

  • Zach

    Being a tech article, I would strongly urge you to change the phrase "Dell Optiplex GX-150 CPUs" to something more like Dell Optiplex GX-150 desktops, as a CPU (Central Processing Unit) is meant to refer to a processor chip, not a computer in its entirety. It'd be the equivilant of calling a car's "ECU" or "engine" alone, a "car." Just throwing it out there... :)

  • Robert

    I think the entire USA was outraged with the way the Trayvon Martin case was tried by the Florida State Attorney's office. We saw how gerrymandering, nepotism and croynism can have devastating effects on a community. Is this the best the State of Florida can do. Would you want the State of Florida to defend you or would want to select your own attorney(s) especially in a high profile case? Clearly, the Florida State Attorneys office was overmatched by the defense attorney and his team of lawyers. How many other States have the same problems?

    The Trayvon Martin never had a chance to defend himself or a choice of a competent lawyer.

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